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Minimum Wage Increasing in 26 States in 2022

Highest rate: $15 per hour in California, parts of New York state

NEW YORK — Numerous states and several cities across the United States are days away from implementing changes in minimum wage, according to payroll experts at Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S.

A total of 26 states have announced raises in the minimum wage in 2022, with 22 of those states implementing the increases on January 1.

“These minimum wage increases indicate moves toward ensuring a living wage for people across the country,” says Deirdre Kennedy, senior payroll analyst. “In addition to previously approved incremental increases, the change in presidential administration earlier this year and the ongoing coronavirus pandemic have also contributed to these changes.”

States whose minimum wage will rise on Jan. 1 (unless otherwise noted) include:

  • Arizona — $12.80 per hour, up from $12.15.
  • California — $15.00 per hour for businesses with 26 or more employees, $14.00 for smaller employers. The minimum wage for small employers will reach $15.00 in 2023.
  • Colorado — $12.56 per hour, up from $12.32.
  • Connecticut — $13.00 per hour, increasing to $14.00 on July 1. It's scheduled to reach $15.00 per hour in 2023.
  • Delaware — $10.50 per hour, up from $9.25. Pursuant to legislation signed in July 2021, the minimum wage will increase to $15.00 by 2025.
  • Florida — $10.00 per hour, up from $8.65. Wage rates are adjusted annually based on inflation. A 2020 constitutional amendment will increase the minimum wage to $11.00 in September 2022, and to $15.00 by 2026.
  • Illinois — $12.00 per hour, up from $11.00. It's scheduled to reach $15.00 in 2025.
  • Maine — $12.75 per hour, up from $12.15.
  • Maryland — $12.50 for large employers and $12.20 for small employers, increasing at different increments to reach $15.00 for large employers in 2025 and small employers in 2026.
  • Massachusetts — $14.25 per hour, up from $13.50. It's scheduled to reach $15.00 by 2023.
  • Michigan — $9.87 per hour, up from $9.65.
  • Minnesota — $10.33 per hour (up from $10.08) for employees of large employers with annual gross sales volume not less than $500,000, $8.42 per hour (up from $8.21) for employees of small employers.
  • Missouri — $11.15 per hour, up from $10.30. It's scheduled to reach $12.00 per hour in 2023.
  • Montana — $9.20 per hour, up from $8.75, based on 5.25% cost-of-living change.
  • Nevada — $9.75 per hour for employees who do not receive health benefits, increasing to $10.50 on July 1; $8.75 per hour for employees who do receive health benefits, increasing to $9.50 on July 1.
  • New Jersey — $13.00 per hour for most employees, up from $12.00; $11.90 per hour for those in seasonal employment, working on a farm for hourly or piece-rate wage, or working for employer with fewer than six employees.
  • New Mexico — $11.50 per hour, up from $10.50. It's scheduled to reach $12.00 in 2023.
  • New York — Tiered/rates vary by region: $15 per hour in New York City and in Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties; $12.50 per hour in the remander of the state.
  • Ohio — $9.30 per hour, up from $8.80, based on 5.8% cost-of-living increase. This applies to employees of businesses with annual gross receipts of $342,000 per year (changed from $323,000 in 2021). For employees at smaller companies, the state minimum wage is $7.25 per hour.
  • Oregon — Tiered, with the highest rate in the Metro Portland area at $14.00 per hour ($14.75 effective July 1), the lowest in rural (non-urban) areas at $12.00 per hour ($12.50 effective July 1), and a minimum wage of $12.75 per hour ($13.50 effective July 1) in the rest of the state.
  • Pennsylvania — $7.25 per hour, but $14.00 for employees under governor's jurisdiction.
  • Rhode Island — $12.25 per hour, up from $11.50. It's scheduled to reach $15.00 per hour in 2025.
  • South Dakota — $9.95 per hour, up from $9.45.
  • Vermont — $12.55 per hour, up from $11.75.
  • Virginia — $11.00 per hour, up from $9.50. It's part of a series of scheduled increases to reach $15.00 per hour by 2026.
  • Washington — $14.49 per hour for employees age 18 or older, based on 5.83% cost-of-living increase; $12.32 per hour for employees under age 16.